Kyodo News Digest: May 8, 2022

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Photo taken on May 5, 2022 shows a submerged road in the suburbs of kyiv, Ukraine, as a local dam was destroyed by the Ukrainian army to prevent the Russian advance. (Kyōdo) == Kyōdo

Here is the latest list of news digests selected by Kyodo News.

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No comments from North Korea on alleged missile launch on Saturday

BEIJING — North Korean media made no mention on Sunday of an alleged firing of a ballistic missile launched by a submarine the day before, amid growing speculation that the country could conduct a nuclear test in the near future. coming.

Pyongyang has also not commented on a weapons test since South Korea and Japan said the nuclear-armed nation fired a ballistic missile on Wednesday. North Korean state media usually report on weapons tests the day after they are carried out.

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Former Hong Kong number 2 John Lee wins leadership contest

HONG KONG — John Lee, Hong Kong’s former government No. 2, was chosen as the city’s next chief executive in an uncontested election on Sunday, becoming the first person to secure the top job after climbing the police echelons.

As the sole candidate, Lee received 1,416 votes from the 1,461-member election committee made up mostly of pro-Beijing members, according to the returning officer.

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Okinawa urges scrapping base transfer plan before 50th anniversary return.

NAHA, Japan — Okinawa Prefecture called on the central government to drop a plan to relocate a US airbase to Japan’s southern prefecture in its new proposals for creating a “peaceful and prosperous” future released Saturday ahead of the 50th anniversary of his reversion to Japan later this month.

The proposals also call for a drastic overhaul of the status of forces agreement between Japan and the United States, as Okinawa hosts the bulk of US military installations in Japan, and a series of crimes and accidents involving soldiers. Americans and base personnel angered locals. They see the deal as overprotecting U.S. service members and grassroots civilian workers if they are implicated in crimes.

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Government plans to revoke operator’s license of sunken boat in Hokkaido

SAPPORO – Japan’s transport ministry is considering revoking the license of the operator of a tour boat that sank off Hokkaido two weeks ago, leaving 14 dead and 12 missing, government sources said on Saturday. ministry, marking what would be the heaviest administrative penalty ever imposed under maritime law. transport law.

Seiichi Katsurada, the chairman of Shari-based boat operator Shiretoko Yuransen, submitted documents claiming he had at least three years of experience in operations, although he did not have a boating license and was the company’s chief operating officer, the sources said.

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Japan to boost tourism at Ainu cultural complex: government spokesperson

TOKYO — The Japanese government will promote inbound tourism at a major cultural complex in Hokkaido dedicated to the indigenous Ainu people, Chief Cabinet Secretary Hirokazu Matsuno said on Sunday.

Matsuno, who also heads the government headquarters for promoting Ainu politics, visited the Upopoy compound in the northern town of Shiraoi on the main island, his first trip since taking over as gatekeeper -Government speech in October. He also had talks with Hokkaido Governor Naomichi Suzuki and local people preserving Ainu culture.

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10% suffer from sequelae of COVID-19 1 year after their discharge: survey

TOKYO — About 10% of people admitted to hospitals with coronavirus symptoms continued to suffer sequelae a year after discharge, a recent survey compiled by a Health Ministry research group showed.

The most common persistent symptom was reduced muscle strength at 7.4%, followed by difficulty breathing at 4.4% and lethargy at 3.5%, according to the survey.

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Japan, Fiji confirm deepening ties amid concerns over China’s influence

TOKYO – Japan and Fiji confirmed on Saturday that they would continue to cooperate closely for peace and stability in the Pacific region as they shared concerns over a recent security deal between China and the Solomon Islands, a said the Japanese government.

At a meeting in the Fijian capital, Suva, Japanese Foreign Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi and Fijian Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama, who also serves as Foreign Minister, affirmed the goal of realizing an “Indo-Pacific free and open,” amid China’s growing military and economic weight in the region.

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Japanese Prime Minister Kishida plans to attend international security forum in June

TOKYO – Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida is due to attend a major international security forum next month in Singapore, Japanese government sources said on Saturday.

If it materializes, the presence of a Japanese prime minister at the June 10-12 annual meeting will be the first since 2014, when his predecessor Shinzo Abe took part in the Asian security summit, known as the Shangri Dialogue. -The.

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